Lead and Lead Testing shared by shared by home remodeling contractor in Chicago Suburbs

Being in the Know: Lead and Lead Testing

At Four Seasons Contracting, Inc., we want to be your home remodeling contractor in Chicago Suburbs; serving Batavia, Dekalb, Elburn, Geneva, Naperville, Oswego, Plainfield, St. Charles, Sugar Grove, Sycamore, Yorkville, and beyond. But further to that, we also want to provide you with news and articles of interest that may help in your home ownership. Some of our articles will be about remodeling, about decorating, about energy efficiency, and much more. We hope these articles will be of use to you and while we know not every tip or hint will apply to every visitor, you can certainly get a lot of great ideas.

Being in the Know: Lead and Lead Testing

If a home was built before 1978, old lead paint on your walls, doors, windows and sills may be dangerous. Federal and state regulatory standards have helped to minimize or eliminate the amount of lead in air, drinking water, soil, consumer products, food, and occupational settings. However, older homes should be thoroughly inspected by a licensed professional for lead within the structure.

“Lead is particularly dangerous to children because their growing bodies absorb more lead than adults do and their brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead. Babies and young children can also be more highly exposed to lead because they often put their hands and other objects that can have lead from dust or soil on them into their mouths. Children may also be exposed to lead by eating and drinking food or water containing lead or from dishes or glasses that contain lead, inhaling lead dust from lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil or from playing with toys with lead paint. Adults may also breath lead dust by spending time in areas where lead-based paint is deteriorating, and during renovation or repair work that disturbs painted surfaces in older homes and buildings. A pregnant woman’s exposure to lead from these sources is of particular concern because it can result in exposure to her developing baby.” (http://www2.epa.gov/lead/learn-about-lead#lead)

Homebuyers
“Federal law requires that before being obligated under a contract to buy housing built prior to 1978, buyers must receive the following from the homeseller:

An EPA-approved information pamphlet on identifying and controlling lead-based paint hazards titled Protect Your Family From Lead In Your Home.

Any known information concerning the presence of lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards in the home or building.

For multi-unit buildings, this requirement includes records and reports concerning common areas and other units when such information was obtained as a result of a building-wide evaluation.

An attachment to the contract, or language inserted in the contract, that includes a “Lead Warning Statement” and confirms that the seller has complied with all notification requirements.

A 10-day period to conduct a paint inspection or risk assessment for lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards. Parties may mutually agree, in writing, to lengthen or shorten the time period for inspection. Homebuyers may waive this inspection opportunity. If you have a concern about possible lead-based paint, then get a lead inspection from a certified inspector before buying.” (http://www2.epa.gov/lead/real-estate-disclosure#homebuyers)

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Real Estate Agents and Home Sellers
“As real estate agents and home sellers, you play an important role in protecting the health of families purchasing and moving into your home. Buildings built before 1978 are much more likely to have lead-based paint. Federal law requires you to provide certain important information about lead paint before a prospective buyer is obligated under a contract to purchase your home.

Real estate agents must:
Inform the seller of his or her obligations under the Real Estate Notification and Disclosure Rule. In addition, the agent is responsible if the seller or lessor fails to comply; unless the failure involves specific lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazard information that the seller or lessor did not disclose to the agent. Read the regulations that includes these requirements.

Provide, as part of the contract process, an EPA-approved information pamphlet on identifying and controlling lead-based paint hazards titled Protect Your Family From Lead In Your Home. Attach to contract, or insert language in the contract, a “Lead Warning Statement” and confirmation that you have complied with all notification requirements.

Provide a 10-day period to conduct a paint inspection or risk assessment for lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards. Parties may mutually agree, in writing, to lengthen or shorten the time period for inspection. Homebuyers may waive this inspection opportunity.” (http://www2.epa.gov/lead/real-estate-disclosure#homebuyers)

The links we have provided are brought to you by the EPA. We suggest that you check out this site to learn more about lead hazards. Testing for lead should be performed by a licensed and properly equipped professional. In the event you do have lead, it is important that a professional extract samples carefully to submit for testing. Again, disrupting lead and making the element airbourne will be very dangerous. Your licenesed inspector will be able to submit your samples with proper handling and will be able to tell you if you do have lead. Your inspector will be able tell you which affected areas of your home need repair. Just like your inspection, if you need repairs related to lead you need to make sure that a professional company handles this hazardous material removal.

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